He said She said*a list of words for said*

He said, she said.

He said, she said. (Photo credit: Henry McLin)

 

 

Today’s post is all about ways to say said. Try writing a short poem about things that are said without using the word said until the end of the poem.

Megaphone for Health Care ReformAcknowledged

Added

Admitted

Advised

Agreed

Announced

Answered

Approved

Argued

Assumed

Talk Zone

Assured

Asked

Babbled

Bargained

Began

Boasted

Bragged

Called

Claimed

Commanded

Commented

talk
talk (Photo credit: lovelornpoets)

Complained

Cried

Decided

Demanded

Denied

Described

Dictated

Emphasized

Estimated

Exclaimed

Explained

Expressed

Giggle!
Giggle! (Photo credit: wwward0)

Feared

Giggled

Grinned

Grunted

Indicated

Insisted

Instructed

Laughed

lecture room
lecture room (Photo credit: panos kouros)

Lectured

Lied

Mentioned

Moaned

Mumbled

Murmured

Nagged

Noted

Notified

Objected

Observed

Ordered

Loudspeaker Yell
Loudspeaker Yell (Photo credit: KnownColor)

Pleaded

Pointed out

Prayed

Predicted

Questioned

Reassured

Related

Repeated

Replied

Responded

Requested

Restated

Revealed

Roared

Ruled

Speak up, make your voice heard
Speak up, make your voice heard (Photo credit: HowardLake)

Scolded

Screamed

Shouted

Shrieked

Snapped

Sneered

Sobbed

Spoke

Sputtered

Stammered

Stated

Stormed

message board
message board (Photo credit: Hungarian Snow)

Suggested

Taunted

Thought

Told

Urged

Uttered

Vowed

Wailed

Warned

Whispered

I'm lying
I’m lying (Photo credit: Tayrawr Fortune)

 

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Writing Prompt “A Note”

Today’s writing prompt comes to you all the way from Sedona, AZ.

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona, Arizona (Photo credit: dracobotanicus)

Kayt Pearl is the new director of the Arizona branch of Young Voices Be Heard. YVBH is a youth poetry group in Sedona. If you would like to learn more about them you can click on the link for their webpage over in the blogroll.

We are super excited about working with this talented group and hope to feature some of their writers on our page in the near future.

Alright now it’s time to write.

A note behind the picture

note

note (Photo credit: S@Z)

A picture sitting on your mantle unexpectedly falls and crashes to the floor.
As you go to pick it up, you notice a note hidden behind the picture.

The message is from the future, written by you.

It instructs you to do something important. Something absolutely crucial.
What does it say?

Prompt*Late and light

Your writing prompt for the day is to tell me what the light at the end of the concrete bench is. Why is it that? What is it doing and where is it going?

Warm Up Exercise

This is one of my favorite exercises for getting the creative mojo running. Long long long ago in the days of these weird things called typewriters aspiring writers would press keys randomly just for the sound it made. There was something about the clacking of the keys and end of the line ding that got the mind ready to write.   This exercise is similar in that it negates our inner critic.

Typebars in a 1920s typewriter

Typebars in a 1920s typewriter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is what you do.

Step one: Get out a piece of paper and tear it into ten, twenty, or thirty pieces.

Step two: Write a different word on each piece of paper and fold the pieces up.

Step three: Put the pieces of paper in a container and shake it up.

Step four: Get out a notebook, or paper and pen. (make sure you have an extra on standby just in case.)

Step five: Get ready to write. Ok so these are the rules. Once you start writing you don’t get to scratch out anything or stop writing. You don’t get to read as you go and most importantly none of the writing has to make sense. This is pure free flow writing with the only intent being to get your hand moving and the words flowing.

Now start by pulling out a piece of paper and reading the word. Write everything and anything no matter how dumb or small or great down and keep going until you have that moment when you pause. The second you pause to think or stop grab another piece of paper and go again. Remember the point is not to make sense, but to just write.

Step six: Do this until the words are all used up. When the last word is done you stop and move on to writing other things. Don’t read what you wrote. Don’t think about what you just wrote, it doesn’t matter. The point was to warm up. You can always go back in a few days and see if you wrote anything that was something you could use.

A writing storm

   The clouds rolled in around mid afternoon. Muggy and hot, the air felt charged with weight. As the sun set the clouds released their held breath with crackling lightening and rolling thunder.

Today’s writing prompt is inspired by our local weather. Today I would suggest writing about violent change. That moment when water crosses the threshold from waiting to boil to boiling, the calm before the storm when it is no longer calm. The moment someone falls from their bike just before they hit the round.

Once you have written about that moment or series of moments I want you to take all of the language you used to describe it and apply it towards an abstract idea. Take boiling water and use it to write about a break up, use a storm to describe a desire or the concept of fear.

As always have fun writing and when your ready share your experiments.

Writing Prompt 2* I woke up*

Today’s writing prompt is fairly simple. Imagine for a moment it is the middle of summer and when you left your house in the morning this is what you opened your door too. Tell the story of how this happened. Be creative and crazy with your tale.

Part two- When you are done telling the story of how this happened describe the street as the sun comes out. What do you notice as the ice begins to melt? What does it sound like? How do you feel about everything melting?

 

As always if you find yourself going off into another direction don’t fight it. Write like water, fluid and flexible. I would love to see the works you are creating from these prompts so by all means please send them to me so I can post them.

D

 

Writing exercise (courtesy of Young Voices Be Heard)

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